ST CLEMENT'S CHURCH

ST. CLEMENT'S ANGLICAN CHURCH

 

Epiphany Season:  

when God's love for the world 

shown in the birth of Jesus,

starts to shape our lives:

A favourite Epiphany poem is

by Howard Thurman (1899 – April 10, 1981)

a black preacher::

When the song of the angels is stilled,
When the star in the sky is gone,
When the kings and princes are home,
When the shepherds are back with their flock,
The work of Christmas begins:
To find the lost,
To heal the broken,
To feed the hungry,
To release the prisoner,
To rebuild the nations,
To bring peace among people,
To make music in the heart.

 

 You are warmly invited to worship with us at St. Clement's.

The main worship on Sunday mornings at 9:45 a.m. is a contemporary eucharist or holy communion in the Anglican style. We sing a lively mixture of new and traditional favourite hymns that fit the theme of the bible texts for the day. Our sermons are based on the Bible text and applied to how we live in today's complex world. We are reverent and relaxed, not formal. We work to have worship give voice to our praise of God, our gratitude for the gift of life, and to our human struggles as we respond to a loving God.

We are a mix of ages and stages of life.  Children are welcome in our worship.  We have a nursery available as well as program for school-aged children and youth.

If you would like to meet with Lynne McNaughton, priest at St. Clements, call her at 604-780-1420... to talk about your spiritual journey.

 

 

 

 

From Fred Hiltz, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada,

Part of his response to the Primates meeting in the world-wide

Anglican Communion

(If you would like to speak about this with Lynne, please 

call her at 604-780-1420)

 

"Throughout the meeting of the Primates last week, I thought much about St. Paul's teaching about the Church being the Body of Christ in the world.  It is the image at the very heart of Anglican ecclesiology.  In 165 countries we are 85 million people proclaiming the Gospel of Christ in more than 1000 languages.  We are a family of autonomous Churches that understand ourselves to be "Formed by Scripture, Shaped by Worship, Ordered for Communion, and Directed by God's Mission.

While for the most part this principle inspires our common work and witness, there are times when our capacity to abide by it is deeply challenging given the very diverse political, cultural, social and missional contexts in which we live. While being ordered for communion, we recognize that in the face of deep difference of theological conviction over certain matters of faith and doctrine the bonds of affection between us can be strained, sometimes sadly so, to the point of people speaking of a state of impaired communion."

He expresses then deep regret for the treatment of LGBTQ members in the Anglican Communion:

"I apologize for the manner in which the Church has often regarded the LGBTQ community and condemned their lives with very harsh language. I call on our Church to re-affirm its commitment to rejecting anywhere in the world criminal sanctions against lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, or queer or questioning people. I call on our Church to renew its resolve in listening to the voices and the stories of its LGBTQ members as we wrestle through conversations regarding the pastoral care we are called to provide for all people. I ask the prayers of the whole Church for the LGBTQ people in the midst of the hurt they are bearing and the hope to which they cling for the recognition and sacramental blessing of their relationships."

Archbishop Fred does go on to sound his own note of hope: 

 

"While the meeting of the Primates was particularly challenging with respect to relationships throughout the Communion, there was about midway through a declared unanimous commitment to continue to walk together and not apart. This meeting could have been marked by calls for exclusion of the Presiding Bishop of The Episcopal Church and me. It was not. It could have been marked by walk-outs as some had anticipated. It was not. It could have been marked by ranting and raving.  It was not. Instead it was marked by perseverance to remain in dialogue that was frank but respectful. It was marked by a generosity of grace and patience, with one another." 

 

***

ASH WEDNESDAY SERVICES:

7:30 am - St. Clement's Church, followed by a light breakfast

12 noon  - St. John's Anglican

7:30 pm - St. Catherine's Anglican Church

 

 

The North Shore News published an interview with Honada and family which you can read by clicking on this link:

http://www.nsnews.com/syrian-refugees-settle-in-blueridge-1.2159558

 

 

 

Honada (Mom), Saeed (Dad), Nour (18 year old), Ahmad (12 year old) and Ibrahim (11) are moving into the Blueridge home on Sunday afternoon. The children are settled into their respective schools and look forward to making many friends in their new neighbourhood.

The Welcome Potluck Dinner was attended by approximately 150 supporters and friends and was a joyeous and memorable occasion for all.

 

Please look at our latest calendar to see our upcoming events. Lots happening!

There's a “Parent's Room” at the back of the church where you can see and hear the service.

Bulletin:

The Last Sunday of Epiphany - The Transfiguration of the Lord - February 07, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

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